Pankhi

Pankhi

PANKHI PROJECT, TBZs initiative

Domestic violence has serious economic, social and health consequences – not only for women and children, but also for the wider family. It is an acute problem in India. Overall, one-third of women age 15-49 have experienced physical violence and about 1 in 10 have experienced sexual violence and emotional violence. In total, 35 percent have experienced physical or sexual violence. This figure translates into millions of women who have suffered, and continue to suffer, at the hands of husbands and other family members.

Slapping is the most common act of physical violence by husbands. Thirtyfour percent of married women say their husband has slapped them; 15 percent say their husband has pulled their hair or twisted their arms; and 14 percent have been pushed, shaken, or had something thrown at them.

One in 10 married women have experienced sexual violence at the hands of their husband, i.e., they have been physically forced against their will by their husband to have sex or perform other sexual acts they did not want to perform.

Often, this physical and sexual violence causes injuries. Almost two in five women who have experienced physical or sexual violence report having injuries, including 36 percent who had cuts, bruises or aches; 9 percent who had eye injuries, sprains, dislocations, or burns; and 7 percent who had deep wounds, broken bones, broken teeth, or other serious injuries.

The prevalence of spousal physical or sexual violence is much higher among women in the poorest households (49 percent) than among women in the wealthier households (18 percent).

Nearly half (46 percent) of married women with no education have experienced spousal violence; similarly, nearly half of women whose husbands have no education (47 percent) have experienced spousal violence.

Twelve percent of married women with 12 or more years of education have experienced spousal violence, compared with 21 percent of married women whose husbands have 12 or more years of education. This suggests that women’s own education reduces their likelihood of experiencing spousal violence more than their husband’s education.

Baroda Citizens Council Pankhi Project helps such women:

through central helpline we provide counseling and rehabilitation to the women suffering from domestic violence.

Initiates to integrate counseling and crisis intervention through a central helpline service available to the victim.

Puts efforts to increase the identification, reporting and referral of case of gender based violence by community leaders through the use of helpline.

To provide needs based and timely referrals to the victims of domestic violence.

Conducts awareness sessions on gender based violence in community.

Aims of Pankhi Project:

Through central helpline we provide counseling and rehabilitation to the women suffering from domestic violence.

Objectives of Pankhi Project:

To integrate counseling and crisis intervention through a central helpline service available to the victim.

To increase the identification, reporting and referral of case of gender based violence by community leaders through the use of helpline.

To provide needs based and timely referrals to the victims of domestic violence.

To conduct awareness sessions on gender based violence in community.